Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS)

According to the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation, “Individuals with EDS have a defect in their connective tissue, the tissue that provides support to many body parts such as the skin, muscles and ligaments. The fragile skin and unstable joints found in EDS are the result of faulty collagen. Collagen is a protein, which acts as a “glue” in the body, adding strength and elasticity to connective tissue.

Further, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders, characterized by articular (joint) hypermobility, skin extensibility and tissue fragility. There are six major types of EDS. The different types of EDS are classified according to their manifestations of signs and symptoms.”

Treatment and management of EDS varies from individual to individual. People with EDS generally have a normal life span. However, people with the vascular type of EDS have a high risk of sudden death, due to a high risk for major organ and/or blood vessel rupture.

Some symptoms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome include: Double-jointedness, easily damaged, bruised, and stretchy skin, easy scarring and poor wound healing, flat feet, increased joint mobility, joints popping, early arthritis, joint dislocation, joint pain, premature rupture of membranes during pregnancy, very soft and velvety skin, vision problems, and gastrointestinal problems.

Some complications of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome include: Chronic joint pain, early-onset arthritis, failure of surgical wounds to close (or stitches tear out), premature rupture of membranes during pregnancy, rupture of major vessels, including a ruptured aortic aneurysm (only in vascular EDS), rupture of a hollow organ such as the uterus or bowel (only in vascular EDS), rupture of the eyeball, Dysautonomia, and Gastrointestinal problems.

There is no known cure for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Additional research is needed to learn more about the cause, cure, and treatment.

Sources: http://www.ednf.org/ http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/

Dysautonomia

Dysautonomia literally means dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system. The autonomic nervous system is the master regulator of organ function throughout the body. It is involved in the control of heart rate, blood pressure, temperature, respiration, digestion and other vital functions.

Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

Individuals with EDS have a defect in their connective tissue, the tissue that provides support to many body parts such as the skin, muscles and ligaments. The fragile skin and unstable joints found in EDS are the result of faulty collagen.

Vasculitis

Vasculitis is a family of rare and chronic autoimmune diseases, all characterized by the inflammation of blood vessels. There are more than 15 different vasculitis diseases, all of which can affect people of various ages, races, and genders.